Australia to adopt INNs

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has announced that it will proceed with international harmonisation of drug names used in Australia from April 2016. For the past decade or so, since the United Kingdom moved to the World Health Organization’s International Nonproprietary Names (INNs), we’ve been in the anomalous situation of using former British Approved Names despite these no longer being used in the UK (nor listed in the British Pharmacopoeia). The TGA website has a list of affected drugs.

Some changes are trivial:

  • Substitution of “ph” with “f” (e.g. cefalexin, guaifenesin)
  • Substitution of “y” with “i” (e.g. amoxicillin, ciclosporin)
  • Substitution of “th” with “t” (e.g. indometacin)

Others are more significant (and will require dual-labelling for 3 years), for example:

  • Dosulepin (dothiepin)
  • Formoterol (eformoterol)
  • Furosemide (frusemide)
  • Glycopyrronium bromide (glycopyrrolate)
  • Hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea)
  • Lidocaine (lignocaine)

On the contentious subject of adrenaline vs epinephrine, the TGA has followed the UK practice where dual-labelling “adrenaline (epinephrine)” will be used indefinitely.

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