Marking the border

There are some places in the world where you barely know that you’re crossing a border – even an international one – such as when driving on the M1/A1 between Dublin and Belfast in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom respectively. The only indication that you’ve crossed into another country is a road sign stating that speed limits are now expressed in miles per hour or kilometres per hour, depending on which direction you’re travelling. There are historical and political reasons for this, of course.

Australian state borders, on the other hand, tend to be clearly marked. Within the twin towns of Tweed Heads NSW and Coolangatta QLD, apart from the usual signs, there is the following marker on Boundary Street.

NSW–Queensland border marker, Boundary Street

The majority of people crossing the border, however, bypass the towns and instead see this abstract sculpture on the M1 Pacific Motorway.

NSW–Queensland border, M1

I suppose it has to be obvious, in case the poorly designed Queensland road signs (one of which is visible above) don’t clue you in to the fact that you’ve crossed the border!